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Styx- Pieces of Eight 40th Anniversary- Tommy Shaw, James”JY” Young

Back when deejays on FM rock stations still chose the songs that you heard on the radio, before pre-scheduled computerized playlists, it wass not possible to accurately quantify exactly how many times a particular song or album was getting airplay in a given day, week, or month. But I’ll bet you a rib dinner at Charlie Vergos’ Rendezvous that the two most played new albums forty years ago when I joined ROCK 103 Memphis were Boston Don’t Look Back  and Styx Pieces of Eight.  We literally wore the grooves off of the initial white label promo copy of Pieces of Eight  by playing in heavy rotation “Great White Hope”, “Sing for the Day”, “Queen of Spades”, and two soon-to-be rock anthems, “Blue Collar Man” and “Renegade“, responsible for explosive sales in car stereos and, when Styx played concerts, Bic lighters.

While the facts of history ( music or otherwise) remain constant over the passage of time, it is fascinating over the years how perceptions of those facts sometimes do change, even dramatically, as in the case of Chicagoland favorites Styx. For instance, here is Greg Prato‘s assessment of the band on AllMusic.com circa 2013: “The rare art rock band with commercial success, capable of producing monster hits with stadium rock, sweeping power ballads, and concept albums.” With that glowing review, you might then be puzzled by Styx co-founder Dennis DeYoung warily telling a Rolling Stone  magazine writer in July 2011, ” The last time Rolling Stone  called to interview me, you know when it was? 1975. ‘Lady’ had just become a hit record by accident.” ( JY left, Tommy Shaw)

In this classic rock interview focusing on the  1978 release of Pieces of Eight , former Styx member DeYoung  confesses that, in spite of his major conceptual songwriting role on the band’s 1977 breakthrough three million seller The Grand Illusion , the highly-anticipated follow-up Pieces of Eight was not his finest hour. This admission underscores the short term significance of how Styx guitarists/ songwriters/ singers Tommy Shaw and James Young stepped up creatively to fill the void on Pieces of Eight, again selling triple platinum with the muscular “Blue Collar Man”,”Renegade”,”The Great White Hope”,”Queen of Spades”, and “Sing for the Day”. Long term, however, it may have signaled the beginning of a divergence in the creative direction of Styx, an opinion shared by many long time Styx fans but rejected, albeit weakly, by DeYoung in the 2011 Rolling Stone interview.

What is without debate is the rave reception being received by the Shaw/ JY-led Styx with Lawrence Gowan, Todd Sucherman, and Ricky Phillips both on the impressive latest Styx studio interplanetary Mars-themed concept album The Mission  and its highly-anticipated 5.1 surround sound version shipping now. And this just in: on Sunday, August 19, STYX’s current headlining tour will bring them to the Redding Civic Auditorium in Redding, CA, near the origin of the massive Carr Fire, which has been called the sixth most destructive fire in California history and is still only 45 percent contained after more than a week. In response to the devastation, Styx is making a donation of $5,000 to the Shasta Regional Community Foundation via their Rock To The Rescue 501(c)3 organization, which will be matched by the band themselves as well as the venue out of net proceeds from the show up to $15,000. There will also be ways for fans to donate at the show, which is NOT being cancelled, and fans are being encouraged to donate directly to the charity’s website. Tickets for the concert are still available at https://bit.ly/2vcwxZZ