Posts

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Alice Cooper- Love It to Death 50th Anniversary

Fifty years ago,"Love It to Death" in March 1971 may have been the the third album by the band Alice Cooper, but that doesn't change the fact that nobody bought the first two. By December of that same year, EVERYBODY had heard "I'm Eighteen" off of Love It to Death ,  and Alice Cooper had written and recorded a soon-to-be-classic additional full album, Killer .And it was
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Heart- Dreamboat Annie 45th- Ann Wilson, Nancy Wilson

"In the Studio" with Ann & Nancy Wilson of Heart for the real rock fairy tale of "Dreamboat Annie" on its 45th anniversary.
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Doobie Brothers- Best pt 2- Tom Johnston, Pat Simmons

The surprise success from "Black Water" afforded the Doobie Brothers some creative license on their next album, "Stampede",  released in April 1975. But as you will hear from Patrick Simmons, Tom Johnston, and the late Doobie drummer Mike Hossack, the non-stop grind of five years of one-nighters, stopping only long enough to record the next album, was starting to create stress fractures in the foundation of the band which  would sideline Tom Johnston with a bleeding ulcer and, ultimately, alter the sound of the Doobie Brothers for the next decade.
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Santana- Abraxas 50th- Carlos Santana, Gregg Rolie, Michael Shrieve

In the Studio we never featured a more influential, important, essential album than Santana 's second effort, "Abraxas" released in October 1970. Simply stated, this is the Magna Carta of World Music. Carlos Santana and Gregg Rolie are joined by drummer Michael Shrieve for the fiftieth anniversary.

Night Ranger- 7 Wishes- Jack Blades

The songs “Four in the Morning” and the touching true story “Goodbye”, both from Night Ranger’s May 1985 album “7 Wishes”, are revealed by singer/composer/bass player Jack Blades In the Studio on the album’s 35th anniversary.

Robert Plant- Shaken ‘n’ Stirred 35th Anniversary

"The Principle of Moments",  Robert Plant's second solo album, first convinced us that Plant could sustain a viable solo career outside of the legendary Led Zeppelin, which he fronted for twelve fabled years, but for me personally it was "Shaken 'n' Stirred" in 1985, served pre-release on a Walkman at 40,000 feet over the Atlantic Ocean,  that began my professional relationship with the complicated singer.
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Pete Townshend- Empty Glass 40th Anniversary- Pete Townshend

By April 1980 we in the rock music world were beginning to miss Townshend's new music, which had been a pretty consistent mainstay of rock'n'roll for fifteen years prior but had been understandably MIA since the sudden death of madcap Who drummer Keith Moon in 1978. Townshend filled Empty Glass   with his grief over the loss of his friend, as well as very personal subjects including alcoholism, adult relationships, and his conflicted reaction to Punk Rock in the songs"Rough Boys","A Little is Enough","Gonna Get Ya", and pop spiritual"Let My Love Open the Door", a Top Five US hit.
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Aerosmith- Toys in the Attic 45th Anniversary- Steven Tyler, Brad Whitford

We dust off "Toys in the Attic",  the breakthrough third album for Aerosmith in  April 1975. Contrary to what you might assume, through their first two albums Aerosmith struggled to get noticed. In this classic rock interview, Aerosmith drummer Joey Kramer reminded me that "Dream On" from their debut by then had been released as a single three times  and flopped twice.
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20 More Rock Hall Snubs

20 More Rock Hall Snubs
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Queen- Sheer Heart Attack- Brian May, Roger Taylor

Queen   headlining the Rainbow Theatre for the first time in late March 1974 were so impressive in concert that when they booked the same venue in November later that same year to premiere their third studio album, "Sheer Heart Attack" , the young foursome had to add a second night.