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Grateful Dead- Blues for Allah 45th Anniversary- Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, Phil Lesh

If you really want to have fun with a self-proclaimed Deadhead, first have him/ her set down their phone and then ask them to name the Grateful Dead's highest-charting Billboard   album up to the band's 1987 best-seller, "In the Dark" . You'll get a lot "Workingman's Dead" and "American Beauty" guesses, and after that I'd have picked "Terrapin Station". The correct answer turns out to be the tasty mid-decade effort by the Grateful Dead, "Blues for Allah". Bob Weir, Mickey Hart, & Phil Lesh are In the Studio.

Live Aid 35th Anniversary- Neil Young- Helpless- Philadelphia

Proving to the whole world that day to be anything other than "Helpless", Neil Young and a cast of a hundred thousand in Philadelphia's JFK Stadium joined a similar group in London's Wembley Stadium via satellite, and an estimated 1.4 billion viewing and listening worldwide, to raise money and awareness for starving residents of Ethiopia, Sudan, and sub-Saharan Africa on July 13, 1985 for Live Aid 35th anniversary.

Eddie Money- No Control

It occurred that one of the less recognized aspects of the brief but all-important Punk Rock trend in the latter half of the Seventies is how it aided and abetted countless upstart bands at the same time which were not necessarily a part of that CBGB punk scene... Singer/ songwriter Eddie Money may have been in San Francisco when he convinced legendary concert promoter Bill Graham to manage him, but both Money and his mentor were Big Apple natives, which didn't hurt when Columbia Records offered Eddie a deal for his self-titled debut in 1977.
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Woodstock pt1- Carlos Santana, Pete Townshend, Graham Nash

Woodstock Festival was unequaled in sheer scale, still heard fifty years later in the voices of Carlos Santana, Pete Townshend, the late Paul Kantner of the Jefferson Airplane, Graham Nash of Crosby, Stills, and Nash, and the late Alvin Lee of Ten Years After,