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21

Doobie Brothers- Stampede 45th Anniversary- Tom Johnston, Pat Simmons

The surprise success from “Black Water” afforded the Doobie Brothers some creative license on their next album, “Stampede”,  released in April 1975. But as you will hear from Patrick Simmons, Tom Johnston, and the late Doobie drummer Mike Hossack, the non-stop grind of five years of one-nighters, stopping only long enough to record the next album, was starting to create stress fractures in the foundation of the band which  would sideline Tom Johnston with a bleeding ulcer and, ultimately, alter the sound of the Doobie Brothers for the next decade.

22

Lynyrd Skynyrd- Nuthin’ Fancy 45th Anniversary- Gary Rossington

“Nuthin’ Fancy” indicated a creative well running low for Lynyrd Skynyrd which would only worsen soon on “Gimme Back My Bullets”.  No doubt the non-stop pace of nearly constant touring partly was to blame, but there was something darker and even more sinister which no one outside the band knew, nor anyone in it would admit. This tour had casualties…

24

Little Feat- Waiting for Columbus- Bill Payne, the late Paul Barrere

Little Feat lifers Bill Payne and Paul Barrere sat down with me to talk. Or maybe they should have been lying down on a couch. “I loved him, and I hated him,” said a clearly emotional Barrere in this intense conversation which inevitably begins and ends with the subject of the enigmatic musical genius, Lowell George. This is a no-holds-barred insider’s look at the talented but troubled Little Feat co-founder Lowell George and his complicated relationships within the band prior to his death from a drug-induced heart attack in 1979.

26

Ten Years After- Alvin Lee

“When things get put onto celluloid, they tend to get bigger than life,” the late guitarist/ singer Alvin Lee told me by way of explanation as to how Ten Years After was catapulted from the second tier of English boogie and blues by their prime spot in the Woodstock Festival   movie documentary. The band utilized that momentum to deliver their most popular album ever in late Summer 1971, ” A Space in Time”,  which included “One of These Days”, “Baby Won’t You Let Me Rock’n’Roll You”, and what turned out to be their biggest hit, “I’d Love to Change the World”.

28

John Mellencamp- Jack and Diane 12-91 garage

Just a few days prior to Christmas 1991 , John Mellencamp was rehearsing his band in his garage, literally, in the snow-covered hills of Central Indiana, in preparation for their upcoming 1992 tour . I was invited to interview him and record the band in rehearsal , thus this performance of “Jack and Diane” is absolutely live , no overdubs . In memory of accordion/keyboard player John Cascella .-Redbeard