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19 search results for: Pete Townshend

1

The Who- Who’s Next 50th Anniversary- Pete Townshend

For the golden anniversary of “Who’s Next” by The Who, ranked by Rolling Stone  magazine as the #28 rock album of all time, this August 1971 absolute musical masterpiece is mated with an incredibly illuminating classic rock interview with its composer, Pete Townshend, here In the Studio including the songs “Baba O’Riley”,”Bargain”,”Going Mobile”,”Behind Blue Eyes”,”Getting in Tune”, and “Won’t Get Fooled Again”…

3

Pete Townshend- Empty Glass 40th Anniversary- Pete Townshend

By April 1980 we in the rock music world were beginning to miss Townshend’s new music, which had been a pretty consistent mainstay of rock’n’roll for fifteen years prior but had been understandably MIA since the sudden death of madcap Who drummer Keith Moon in 1978. Townshend filled Empty Glass   with his grief over the loss of his friend, as well as very personal subjects including alcoholism, adult relationships, and his conflicted reaction to Punk Rock in the songs”Rough Boys”,”A Little is Enough”,”Gonna Get Ya”, and pop spiritual”Let My Love Open the Door”, a Top Five US hit.

7

Who- Quadrophenia pt 2- Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey

(cont)… As The Who’s recognized Quadrophenia auteur , Townshend has assessed their almost half-century of musical creation and found it to be good . Pete is a delightful , witty , thoughtful , and refreshingly honest conversationalist who can easily and effectively examine The Who’s epic 1973 opus through a slightly-detached , objective eye which only the passage of time , and maturity , can provide . -Redbeard

9

Who- Early Best- Pete Townshend, Roger Daltrey

“In the case of The Who, the thing that comes across for me is that The Who started as a Pop band. Good Pop possibly is the sublime and the ridiculous, the important and the absurd.” – Pete Townshend

10

Pete Townshend-Face the Face

The mid-Eighties was a most difficult time for the titans of rock’s Second Generation. The Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, and The Who were no longer recording, touring, and in some cases even SPEAKING together. Rock’n’roll was officially in full-blown midlife crisis …