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21 search results for: David Bowie

1

David Bowie- Young Americans 45th Anniversary

By 1975 David Bowie had abandoned the Glam Rock he had virtually invented in the guise of the ego-tripping tragicomic Fallen Rock Star, Ziggy Stardust. Bowie’s mid-decade “Young Americans” album with the #1 hit “Fame” pointed directly toward Disco’s dominance a mere two years later…

2

David Bowie- Changes- Los Angeles 1974

When David Bowie performed “Changes” in Los Angeles in 1974, now with historical hindsight we can see that David Bowie gave us hints of a musical left turn even that night.

3

David Bowie- Let’s Dance

A lot has changed  since April 1983, not the least of which is in the areas of communication, information, and entertainment. So it was no surprise that multi-media maven David Bowie, who seemed tailor-made then for the dawn of the MTV era in America when Let’s Dance  was released, would later be among the first to embrace computer-generated gaming and virtual reality, which David discusses at length here.

6

David Bowie- The Rise & Fall of Ziggy Stardust

To me it has always been inconceivable that the same producer who recorded the claustrophobically dry close-miked sparse arrangements on David Bowie’s The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars ,  an album which sounded unlike any before it in 1972 and precious few since, could two years later also produce […]

7

Echoes In the Studio- Voices of Fallen Rockers

In memoriam : the echoes In the Studio of Neil Peart of Rush, Walter Becker of Steely Dan, Ric Ocasek of The Cars, Paul Barrere of Little Feat, plus David Bowie, Glenn Frey, Chris Squire, Chris Cornell. Hour one of three.

8

More Echoes In the Studio pt 2

In memoriam : More Echoes “In the Studio”, pt 2 with rare interviews with fallen rockers Lou Reed, Bon Scott, Rick Wright, Malcolm Young, George Harrison, David Bowie

9

Dire Straits- Best pt 1- Mark Knopfler

Like David Bowie did five years before and Sting would repeat five years later, Dire Straits’ October 1980 third release “Making Movies”  is Mark Knopfler’s unabashedly “Big Apple” album through the eyes of an Englishman in New York who had grown up an ocean away on Hemingway, Kerouac, Ginsberg, and Bob Dylan.