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David Bowie- Let’s Dance

A lot has changed  since April 1983, not the least of which is in the areas of communication, information, and entertainment. So it was no surprise that multi-media maven David Bowie, who seemed tailor-made then for the dawn of the MTV era in America when Let's Dance  was released, would later be among the first to embrace computer-generated gaming and virtual reality, which David discusses at length here.
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Dire Straits- Best pt 2- Mark Knopfler

When the song "Money for Nothing" by Dire Straits became a worldwide hit in Summer 1985, the album Brothers in Arms spent a stunning nine weeks as the #1-seller in the US in 1985, eventually selling a staggering 26,000,000  copies worldwide. This kind of celebrity could not have happened to a more reluctant rock star than Dire Straits leader Mark Knopfler, and trust me, there is absolutely no way to prepare for what comes next.
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Bon Jovi’s “Prayer” Answered with Rock Hall of Fame Induction

The #1 fan vote-getter in this year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame fan balloting is Bon Jovi. Since starting out in earnest in the early Eighties, living on a prayer of finding fame, fortune, and the rock respect of their many idols who came before…
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Aerosmith- Get a Grip- Steven Tyler, Joe Perry,Tom Hamilton, Brad Whitford, Joey Kramer

 "Livin' on the Edge", "Cryin'","Eat the Rich", "Fever","Line Up","Amazing" ...any wonder that "Get a Grip" is Aerosmith's biggest-selling album worldwide at over twenty million copies? The entire band sat down with me In the Studio to get a handle on "Get a Grip" in a revealing classic rock interview with an American treasure.
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ZZ TOP- Eliminator 35th Anniversary- Billy Gibbons, Dusty Hill, Frank Beard

One of my secret weapons at making ROCK 103 the top-rated radio station in Memphis from 1980 through 1983 was the friendship that developed with the late legendary John Fry and his  wonderfully talented staff at the world-renowned Ardent Studios…
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Pink Floyd- Dark Side of the Moon- David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Roger Waters

To illustrate how seriously many of the post-British Invasion bands were approaching the rock idiom by early 1973, you need look no further than Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of the Moon" to see how this progressive rock movement had matured,  with spectacular results both artistically and commercially, confirmed in this classic rock interview by my guests, musical lunar explorers David Gilmour, Roger Waters, and Nick Mason.
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U2- War- Bono,The Edge, Adam Clayton, Larry Mullen jr

With the rousing martial rhythms from Larry Mullen jr’s drums on the opening to “Sunday Bloody Sunday”, the tortured passion evident in Bono’s voice over The Edge’s stiletto guitar stabs on “New Year’s Day”, and Adam Clayton’s rolling bass on “Surrender” as well as “Two Heats Beat as One”, War  by U2 was a musical proclamation of a serious contender on the unfolding Eighties rock vista. Hear the classic rock interview.

The Late Joe Cocker Paid Tribute to Ray Charles

To continue celebrating American Black History Month here In The Studio, I'm reminded of the definition of rock and roll as told to me by Mr. "Blue Suede Shoes" himself , the late Carl Perkins , " The Blues and Country and Western had a baby , and they called it Rock'n'Roll ." Seeing as we were in Nashville at the time , Perkins could easily have laid it all at the toe-tapping feet of Hank Williams , a rebel Nashville outsider without whom rock simply would not exist ...(more)
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Bryan Adams- Cuts Like a Knife

Bryan Adams interview to explore his breakthrough album "Cuts Like a Knife" from January 1983
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Phil Collins- Hello I Must Be Going

It happened to Elton John, Rod Stewart, Billy Joel, Bruce Springsteen, Bryan Adams, Sting, and most recently U2: US radio and music video outlets overplaying the hits by these most popular musicians, in the programmers' misguided attempts at gaining a bigger audience. But the unfortunate by-product is that these listeners/viewers burn out on the saturation repetition to the peril of the musicians, and the predictable backlash unfortunately is misdirected at the musicians, who had no control over how their songs were appropriated. No one on the planet knows this better now than my guest Phil Collins.