Posts

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David Bowie- Hunky Dory 50th- David Bowie, Mick Ronson

On the golden anniversary of "Hunky Dory", David Bowie's December 1971 fourth album, hard to believe when reading all of the revisionist raves now, that "Hunky Dory"  was a commercial flop, so much so that it failed to even make the Billboard Top 200 sales chart. The late great David Bowie joined me here In the Studio  for the tale, as did his original wingman, guitarist Mick Ronson, for the scoop on "Changes","Andy Warhol", and "Life on Mars?"

Humble Pie- Rockin’the Fillmore 50th- Peter Frampton, Jerry Shirley

...(cont) Humble Pie the full fiery amalgam was unleashed of Small Faces veteran Steve Marriot's megawatt blue-eyed soul voice , the thundering rhythm section of ex-Spooky Tooth bass player Greg Ridley and drummer Jerry Shirley, with the melodic lyrical lead guitar of a teenage Peter Frampton . Frampton and Shirley join me In The Studio for this classic rock interview on the golden anniversary of Humble Pie "Rockin' the Fillmore" @ 50..
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Alice Cooper- Love It to Death- Killer

"Love It to Death" in March 1971 may have been the the third album by the band Alice Cooper, but that doesn't change the fact that nobody bought the first two. By December of that same year, EVERYBODY had heard "I'm Eighteen" off of Love It to Death ,  and Alice Cooper had written and recorded a soon-to-be-classic additional full album, Killer .And it was

Faces- A Nod is as Good as a Wink- Rod Stewart, Ron Wood

Those first two Faces albums were critical faves but received scant U.S. airplay, but that all changed in a hurry in November 1971 with "A Nod is As Good As a Wink" containing the international hit "Stay With Me". Rod Stewart, Ron Wood, & archival comments from the late  Ian McLagan ( Ronnie Lane passed as well ) face the music In the Studio for their most popular album, "A Nod is as Good as a Wink" .
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Led Zeppelin IV- Jimmy Page, Robert Plant

Legendary wrestler-turned-Led Zeppelin manager Peter Grant had an appropriately out-sized role in the Led Zeppelin "4" story as told here In the Studio by Jimmy Page and Robert Plant.

Pink Floyd- Meddle- David Gilmour, Nick Mason, Roger Waters

Judging by the sheer outsized volume of well-deserved attention heaped on Pink Floyd's 1973 game changer "Dark Side of the Moon", one could easily assume it was the Cambridge, England quartet's first of any consequence. "Meddle", containing the embryonic epic "Echoes", my guests Pink Floyd's David Gilmour, Nick Mason, and co-founder with Syd Barrett, Roger Waters unanimously maintain that "Meddle"  was their Apollo 8 musical mission which soon after allowed  Pink Floyd's lunar landing on the far side of rock history.

Van Morrison- Tupelo Honey

the timeless Van Morrison warm musical blanket, "Tupelo Honey" . This ultra-rare, fascinating interview with the reclusive "Howard Hughes of Rhythm 'n' Blues" is nothing short of a revelation...

Moody Blues- Every Good Boy Deserves Favour- Justin Hayward, John Lodge, the late Graeme Edge

"Every Good Boy Deserves Favour"  was the Moody Blues' seventh album in a string of commercially and critically popular efforts including "Days of Future Passed" , "On the Threshold of a Dream" , and "A Question of Balance" . Singer/ lead guitarist Justin Hayward, singer/ bass player John Lodge, and drummer Graeme Edge take "Every Good Boy Deserves Favour"  to share here In the Studio insights into some of the Moody Blues' best of those early years.
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Allman Brothers Band- Live Fillmore East-the late Gregg Allman, Dickey Betts

The original Allman Brothers Band had to be seen and heard live to be fully appreciated, and in 1971 the band headlined four shows over two nights on March 13-14 at the Fillmore East that were recorded. My guests remember it well: one of two original guitarists, Dickey Betts, & the late great Gregg Allman.

Rolling Stones- Honky Tonk Women- London 3-14-71

Eras in music no more follow the calendar than Mother Nature does. Thus fifty years ago in mid-March 1971 the last live performance of the Sixties in effect may actually gone down when the Rolling Stones ended their brief Scottish/ English tour at London's Roundhouse with this final performance of "Honky Tonk Women".